English Native

Site plan
Site plan

Floor plans
Floor plans

Section and facade detail
Section and facade detail

View of the ramp for wolves
View of the ramp for wolves

Proposal overview of the Wolf Science Center
Proposal overview of the Wolf Science Center

View of the smaller enclosure for wolves
View of the smaller enclosure for wolves

Architectural model of Wolf Science Center
Architectural model of Wolf Science Center

Architectural model of the whole area
Architectural model of the whole area




PROJECTINDEX
 
WOLF PIT
Szenti István University
ARCHITECTURE

Wolf Science Center
Wolf pit: A two to three-meter deep, round or square pit, often narrower or wider towards the bottom, which is dug into the trails of wolves and other wild animals. Usually, sharp-pointed stakes were placed at the bottom of the pit. The top of the pit was loosely covered, which collapsed under the weight of the game, and the animal fell into the pit. The hunters went to check their pits at regular intervals, and the animal found in them—unless speared by the stakes—was beaten to death or strangled with a loop thrown around its neck. Contrary to its name, the topic of my graduation project is a wolf science center that focuses on traditional values such as species protection, nature conservation, and education. It strives to combine all these values. The wolf pit represents an associative image, its spatial consequences, together with the circle as a primary geometric form provide the fundamental formula of the concept. The elements below the ground, similarly to a dry ditch, offer an undisturbed insight, but at the same time, the spatial arrangement prevents the animals from jumping out. There is no need for mesh, fences, or jumping barriers. The main element of the complex is the central enclosure that seeks to become one with the underground building housing research and educational functions. The building can be divided into 7 main function groups: service units, genetic lab, clinical-diagnostic lab, ethology, monitoring, veterinary care, and education. Based on this, the building can include any function that ensures the extensive research of the species. The main criterion in designing the floor plan was to achieve a functional separation in which all functions can operate smoothly and autonomously. The plan strives for hierarchy and strictness—just like a pack. However, it tries to loosen up and become more organic on the ground level. It looks for the borderland where the natural and the artificial, architecture and non-architecture can be linked.